What’s getting in the way of your signal?

Wi-Fi makes internet service available to a wide range of devices without physically connecting them to your router. However, it’s important to remember that the strength and quality of your signal can be influenced by several factors:

Home construction materials between the router and your device

Some materials used in home construction can weaken your Wi-Fi signal strength. Metal in particular can cause interference because it can reflect and scatter Wi-Fi signals. Culprits include metal framing, ductwork, electrical panels and metal roofs.

Other electronics in your home

Common, non-connected electronic items can some- times interfere with your Wi-Fi strength. These include microwave ovens (the major offender), cordless phones, Bluetooth devices and even fluorescent lights.

Not Enough Speed?

If you have a number of devices fighting over your Wi-Fi signal, you may want to consider increasing your internet speed. Give us a call. We’ll walk through how you use your broadband internet connection and talk about the right package to meet your needs.

The number of devices sharing your Wi-Fi connection

Every device connected to your Wi-Fi is sharing the total bandwidth of your home’s internet connection. If people in your home are streaming a movie on a tablet, playing a gaming console, watching a smart TV, sharing photos online and searching the internet all at the same time, some users could notice slower performance compared to times when fewer devices are used.

The age of your device and its capabilities

Some computers and gaming consoles may use older technology that can’t take advantage of today’s higher speeds.

 

Too Far Away?

If you use Wi-Fi enabled devices in rooms far away from your router, you may want to consider adding one or more network extenders to your home. Give us a call and we can discuss ways to boost your Wi-Fi signal strength to extend better connection speeds to more rooms — or even to a patio or deck.

The distance between the router and your device

A computer in a second-floor bedroom, for example, may have a weaker connection than a computer on the first floor where the router is located.

 

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